pumpkin dessert recipe

Mom’s Pumpkin Squares

Pumpkin Squares

This recipe has been part of our family for years now.  My mom made them for Thanksgiving every year- and I continue that tradition. Like my mom, I use fresh (or frozen) cooked pumpkin or winter squash. My mom didn’t care much for the taste of canned pumpkin. She would cut up the Halloween pumpkin, cook it, puree it and freeze it- so she could make pumpkin squares anytime she wanted.

The original recipe came from Bisquick, but it had 2 cups of sugar in it. My Mother’s sensibilities kicked in and she cut the sugar down to one cup. Great move on her part. The cake is still plenty sweet with less sugar.

It mixes and bakes up in no time. I normally top it with cream cheese frosting, but it would be good with a simple powdered sugar glaze, a buttercream frosting, or even just a dusting of powdered sugar mixed with a little cinnamon.

The texture is moist and tender and I think you’ll enjoy it as much as I do.

Pumpkin Squares

1 c. sugar
½ c. oil
16 oz. cooked pumpkin, canned, fresh (preferred) or frozen
4 eggs, beaten
2 c. biscuit mix (homemade or Bisquick or Jiffy Mix)
2 t. cinnamon
½ c. raisins, optional
Grease a jelly roll pan and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat first 4 ingredients for 1 minute. Stir in mix, cinnamon and raisins. Pour in prepared pan and bake 25-30 minutes. Test for doneness with a toothpick. Cool and frost. Frosted cake must be kept refrigerated between servings.

Frosting:

8 oz. cream cheese
2/3 c. butter
2 T. milk
2 t. vanilla
3 c. powdered sugar, or more
Beat together until smooth.

Malted Pumpkin Custard

Malted Pumpkin Custard

This custard came about because my friend Joe brought me some malted ice cream one day. We started talking about malt. We wondered what malt was exactly and why did we like it so much.

Malt is a sprouted grain, usually barley, that is dried after it has sprouted. It had a unique flavor that is used in baking, beer making and desserts to name a few. For this recipe I used malted milk powder, which also contains some sugar and dairy.

You can also buy diastatic malt, which I use in bread baking and malt syrup. Let’s not forget how good malt vinegar is on fries.

So back to this recipe. I decided to make a custard base, using whole eggs. I like the texture of the final product. Plus, since I was using a fair amount of pumpkin, I liked the eggs for a little added fat in the recipe. The first time I made it, a couple of friends were over. I put it in the ice cream maker while we were having dinner. Both of them loved it. I knew I had to make it again.

I might have used more than a cup of pumpkin with the latest batch. I know it was at least a cup. It doesn’t matter a whole lot in the scheme of things, but the pumpkin flavor was more pronounced in the batch I made last night. I was fine with that.

I used pumpkin this time, but you can just as easily use other winter squash like butternut or Hubbard.

So here is the recipe. I think you’ll like it as much as we did.

Malted Pumpkin Custard

4 eggs

1 c. half and half

¾ c. sugar

1 c. cooked pumpkin puree – you can use other winter squash

½ c. malted milk powder

1 t. cinnamon

½ t. nutmeg

½ t. salt

In medium saucepan combine eggs, half and half and sugar. Whisk ingredients together. Cook over medium low heat, stirring constantly until mixture thickens and bubbles. Be careful not to scramble the eggs. If the mixture does get lumpy, you can press it through a fine strainer to remove lumps. Let the mixture cool down a little then stir in the remaining ingredients. You can add more or less seasonings according to your taste. When you freeze it, the flavors will be less pronounced. It will taste less sweet, too. Chill mixture several hours or overnight. Freeze using an ice cream maker for best results. Makes about 1 quart.

Pumpkin Fritters

Pumpkin Fritters

These tasty fritters are a fun fall dessert. This is a great recipe when you have a little cooked pumpkin or winter squash to use up. The recipe only uses a cup of cooked pumpkin or winter squash.

It is a pretty simple recipe. I started with cooked butternut squash puree. I added eggs, flour, baking powder and a few other ingredients, then fried them up in oil, and ended up with a really good fritter. Crispy on the outside, soft and tender on the inside. I drained them on paper towels and then rolled them in cinnamon sugar while still warm. You could also dip them in a powdered sugar glaze. I think I might make a maple glaze for the next batch.

Pumpkin Fritters

1 c. cooked, mashed pumpkin or winter squash

2 eggs

2 T. brown sugar

2 t. baking powder

1 t. cinnamon

1/2 t. baking soda

1/2 t. nutmeg

1/2 t. salt

1 1/2 c. flour

oil for frying

cinnamon sugar for rolling- powdered sugar would work, too

In mixing bowl combine all ingredients, except the flour and beat until smooth. Stir in flour. Batter will be thick. Heat oil to 350 degrees.* There should be enough oil in the pan top be at least 1 inch deep- or deeper. To save oil I used a smallish pan and cooked 3-4 fritters at a time. Drop dough by rounded teaspoonfuls into hot oil and cook, turning once until golden brown on both sides. This will take about 3 minutes.  Drain on paper towels then roll in cinnamon sugar while warm. Makes 24-30. Best served warm.

* Fun way to know when your oil has hit 350 degrees. Place an un-popped popcorn kernel in the oil. Popcorn pops at 350 degrees.

Mom’s Pumpkin Chiffon

Mom’s Pumpkin Chiffon

I fondly remember when my Mom used to make this dessert. I think of her whenever I make it. From a technical cooking standpoint, it’s not really a chiffon, but that is what my Mom called it, so I will leave it as  Pumpkin Chiffon.

It’s more like a pumpkin pie, without the crust. Super easy to make and quite tasty. I bake it in a casserole dish but you could also make it in individual  ramekins.  This recipe is always a big hit when I make it for friends.

You could use canned or fresh cooked pumpkin or winter squash, like butternut or Hubbard. I always cook up and freeze pumpkin and squash for later use, so frozen would work, too. Because there is no crust, it is also gluten-free.  I sometimes serve it with gingersnaps and whipped cream. It is a lovely Fall dessert. Perfect for Thanksgiving, too.

Mom’s Pumpkin Chiffon

½ c. applesauce
1 c. cooked or canned pumpkin or squash
¾ c. brown sugar
1 t. cinnamon
½ t. salt
½ t. nutmeg
1/8 t. cloves
4 eggs, well beaten
1 c. half and half or evaporated milk
Stir together first seven ingredients. Beat in eggs and stir in milk. Place mixture in 1 ½ quart casserole and bake in a 350-degree oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Serve alone or with cookies. Serves 6-8.

Mom’s Pumpkin Squares

Pumpkin Squares

This recipe has been part of our family for years now.  My mom made them for Thanksgiving every year- and I continue that tradition. Like my mom, I use fresh (or frozen) cooked pumpkin or winter squash. My mom didn’t care much for the taste of canned pumpkin. She would cut up the Halloween pumpkin, cook it, puree it and freeze it- so she could make pumpkin squares anytime she wanted.

The original recipe came from Bisquick, but it had 2 cups of sugar in it. My Mother’s sensibilities kicked in and she cut the sugar down to one cup. Great move on her part. The cake is still plenty sweet with less sugar.

It mixes and bakes up in no time. I normally top it with cream cheese frosting, but it would be good with a simple powdered sugar glaze, a buttercream frosting, or even just a dusting of powdered sugar mixed with a little cinnamon.

The texture is moist and tender and I think you’ll enjoy it as much as I do.

Pumpkin Squares

1 c. sugar
½ c. oil
16 oz. cooked pumpkin, canned, fresh (preferred) or frozen
4 eggs, beaten
2 c. biscuit mix (homemade or Bisquick or Jiffy Mix)
2 t. cinnamon
½ c. raisins, optional
Grease a jelly roll pan and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat first 4 ingredients for 1 minute. Stir in mix, cinnamon and raisins. Pour in prepared pan and bake 25-30 minutes. Test for doneness with a toothpick. Cool and frost. Frosted cake must be kept refrigerated between servings.

Frosting:

8 oz. cream cheese
2/3 c. butter
2 T. milk
2 t. vanilla
3 c. powdered sugar, or more
Beat together until smooth.

“Pumpkin” Fritters

Pumpkin Fritters

These tasty fritters would be a fun dessert for Halloween. This is also a great recipe when you have a little cooked pumpkin or winter squash to use up. The recipe only uses a cup of cooked pumpkin or winter squash.

It is a pretty simple recipe. I started with cooked butternut squash puree. I added eggs, flour, baking powder and a few other ingredients, then fried them up in oil, and ended up with a really good fritter. Crispy on the outside, soft and tender on the inside. I drained them on paper towels and then rolled them in cinnamon sugar while still warm. You could also dip them in a powdered sugar glaze. I think I might make a maple glaze for the next batch.

Pumpkin Fritters

1 c. cooked, mashed pumpkin or winter squash

2 eggs

2 T. brown sugar

2 t. baking powder

1 t. cinnamon

1/2 t. baking soda

1/2 t. nutmeg

1/2 t. salt

1 1/2 c. flour

oil for frying

cinnamon sugar for rolling- powdered sugar would work, too

In mixing bowl combine all ingredients, except the flour and beat until smooth. Stir in flour. Batter will be thick. Heat oil to 350 degrees.* There should be enough oil in the pan top be at least 1 inch deep- or deeper. To save oil I used a smallish pan and cooked 3-4 fritters at a time. Drop dough by rounded teaspoonfuls into hot oil and cook, turning once until golden brown on both sides. This will take about 3 minutes.  Drain on paper towels then roll in cinnamon sugar while warm. Makes 24-30. Best served warm.

* Fun way to know when your oil has hit 350 degrees. Place an un-popped popcorn kernel in the oil. Popcorn pops at 350 degrees.

Pumpkin Ice Cream

Pumpkin Ice Cream

Pumpkin ice cream is such a nice addition to many fall desserts. It makes a nice topper for apple cake or pumpkin roll. Its also pretty good all on its own. I added some cinnamon and vanilla to mine, but you can certainly add more spices. Colder Fall weather might make us think less about ice cream desserts. I don’t think it is ever too cold for ice cream.

This is a nice, simple recipe. I did not use eggs/custard as the base. You just mix the ingredients and freeze. Easier if you have an ice cream maker, but doable without.

Pumpkin Ice Cream

2 c. whipping cream

2 c. pumpkin puree or winter squash

1 c. sugar, or to taste

1 T. molasses

2 t. cinnamon

1 t. vanilla

1/4 t. salt

Combine all ingredients and stir until well mixed and sugar is dissolved. Place in an ice cream maker following the manufacturer’s directions. My machine can’t take the whole recipe at once so I froze it in 2 batches and kept the rest of the pumpkin mixture chilled until ready to use. Place finished ice cream in the freezer until ready to serve.

Note: If you don’t have an ice cream maker you can place the mixture in a shallow pan and freeze until solid. remove from freezer and allow to thaw a little- about 10 minutes then break up and place in a mixing bowl. Whip with a mixer until smooth and return to the freezer. Repeat process once more to end up with creamy ice cream. You can also use a food processor for this step.

Mom’s Pumpkin Squares

Pumpkin Squares

This recipe has been part of our family for years now.  My mom made them for Thanksgiving every year- and I continue that tradition. Like my mom, I use fresh (or frozen) cooked pumpkin or winter squash. My mom didn’t care much for the taste of canned pumpkin. She would cut up the Halloween pumpkin, cook it, puree it and freeze it- so she could make pumpkin squares anytime she wanted.

The original recipe came from Bisquick, but it had 2 cups of sugar in it. My Mother’s sensibilities kicked in and she cut the sugar down to one cup. Great move on her part. The cake is still plenty sweet with less sugar.

It mixes and bakes up in no time. I normally top it with cream cheese frosting, but it would be good with a simple powdered sugar glaze, a buttercream frosting, or even just a dusting of powdered sugar mixed with a little cinnamon.

The texture is moist and tender and I think you’ll enjoy it as much as I do.

Pumpkin Squares

1 c. sugar
½ c. oil
16 oz. cooked pumpkin, canned, fresh (preferred) or frozen
4 eggs, beaten
2 c. biscuit mix (homemade or Bisquick or Jiffy Mix)
2 t. cinnamon
½ c. raisins, optional
Grease a jelly roll pan and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat first 4 ingredients for 1 minute. Stir in mix, cinnamon and raisins. Pour in prepared pan and bake 25-30 minutes. Test for doneness with a toothpick. Cool and frost. Frosted cake must be kept refrigerated between servings.

Frosting:

8 oz. cream cheese
2/3 c. butter
2 T. milk
2 t. vanilla
3 c. powdered sugar, or more
Beat together until smooth.

Pumpkin Chiffon- Gluten Free

Pumpkin Chiffon

I fondly remember when my Mom used to make this dessert. I think of her whenever I make it. From a technical cooking standpoint, it’s not really a chiffon, but that is what my Mom called it, so I will leave it as  Pumpkin Chiffon.

It’s more like a pumpkin pie, without the crust. Super easy to make and quite tasty. I bake it in a casserole dish but you could also make it in individual  ramekins.  This recipe is always a big hit when I make it for friends.

You could use canned or fresh cooked pumpkin or winter squash, like butternut or Hubbard. I always cook up and freeze pumpkin and squash for later use, so frozen would work, too. Because there is no crust, it is also gluten-free.  I sometimes serve it with gingersnaps and whipped cream. It is a lovely Fall dessert. Perfect for Thanksgiving, too.

Mom’s Pumpkin Chiffon

½ c. applesauce
1 c. cooked or canned pumpkin or squash
¾ c. brown sugar
1 t. cinnamon
½ t. salt
½ t. nutmeg
1/8 t. cloves
4 eggs, well beaten
1 c. half and half or evaporated milk
Stir together first seven ingredients. Beat in eggs and stir in milk. Place mixture in 1 ½ quart casserole and bake in a 350-degree oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Serve alone or with cookies. Serves 6-8.

Pumpkin Ice Cream

Pumpkin Ice Cream

Pumpkin ice cream is such a nice addition to many fall desserts. I made a batch to serve with apple cake and butterscotch sauce for a birthday dinner. It is also a nice way to use up some of your Halloween pumpkins.

It has been a while since I made pumpkin ice cream. I think colder Fall weather makes me think less about ice cream desserts. Still, I don’t think it is ever too cold for ice cream.

This is a pretty simple recipe. I did not use eggs/custard as the base. You just mix the ingredients and freeze. Easier if you have an ice cream maker, but doable without.

Pumpkin Ice Cream

2 c. whipping cream

2 c. pumpkin puree or winter squash

1 c. sugar, or to taste

1 T. molasses

2 t. cinnamon

1 t. vanilla

1/4 t. salt

Combine all ingredients and stir until well mixed and sugar is dissolved. Place in an ice cream maker following the manufacturer’s directions. My machine can’t take the whole recipe at once so I froze it in 2 batches and kept the rest of the pumpkin mixture chilled until ready to use. Place finished ice cream in the freezer until ready to serve.

Note: If you don’t have an ice cream maker you can place the mixture in a shallow pan and freeze until solid. remove from freezer and allow to that a little- about 10 minutes then break up and place in a mixing bowl. Whip with a mixer until smooth and return to the freezer. Repeat process once more to end up with creamy ice cream.

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